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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage. law professor jonathan terly has all the details. >> thanks for watching. john boehner isn't having a lot of fun this holiday season. president obama continues his pressure campaign to pass the tax cuts. the president is also taking time to be fesive. john boehner doesn't sound so merry. >> no progress report because there's no progress to report. when it comes to the fis e call cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> the phone call was pleasant, but was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> even though the president apparently designed the negotiating sessions at boehner's request. according to "the new york times," boehner insisted the talks include only himself and the president of the united states. boehner wanted senate democrats and nancy pelosi out of the discussions. democratic senator dick durbin told the times this is now the speaker and the pr
at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemployment was the lowest s
have laws or amendments that outlaw gay marriage. north carolina the most recent state to prohibit it it but nine states, and the district of columbia have already legalized gay marriage or in the process of doing so now. this has been one of the most charged social issues in the marriage. polls indicate people support gay marriage. now we know within a matter of months the supreme court could help settle it once and for all. molly henneberg on fox top story live for us in washington this evening. molly, explain more cases about the justices are going to hear. >> the supreme court had seven same sex marriage cases in front of it and selected these two. windsor vs. the u.s. is the defense of marriage case or dome that case. specifically looking at part of the law that gives federal benefits such as tax breaks to heterosexual married couples, not to same-sex married couples. is that equal under the equal protection clause under the constitution. and the other case hollings worth vs. perry the california case. california voters approved a gay marriage ban after the state supreme court
the gramm-rudman deficit law, which was so important at the time. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician, and he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. [laughter] we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second. fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good, he had the courage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate with talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he also expressed his hope for the future of the senate, saying it is a very special place with very special people. i hope in the coming years that the inst
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make -- there has to be a special mass when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, i do not think they want to ask bair. wright, ith crystal righ sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> they both -- politicians from both sides said they would be able to avoid the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloo
said things like bahama care is the law of the land and backtracked a little, that's a signal. he's saying let's jump off the boat together, not the cliff, the boat. it's about legacy for both of them. chris: the president seems to insist on a rate hike for the top bracket, something close from 35 to 39.6. does he need something more in terms of taxing the rich, like getting rid of deductions for mortgage, charity, state, local? >> he's already got in his package which totals $1.6 trillion, an additional closing loopholes, capping deductions, so yes, he does need more. the president's in a very interesting position. he's got the high ground. he has narrowed the focus. he's got john boehner has his intermediary, his contact. i'm told that white house officials have been talking almost constantly with boehner's people in a very specific discussion about the details of the package so i think he's thinking big about a package he can take to the country and say we have begun to change the mess in washington. chris: welcome to the show, michelle. first i wonder, what does wall want? i a
'm a sportsman. i have firearms. i hunt deer and pheasants and all that kind of stuff. you want law-abiding citizens to give up their rights to own firearms at this point? that's a fair question. >> it is a fair question. and i take every opportunity to emphasize. i'm glad you asked it again. absolutely not. >> well then you have a law-abiding citizen who happened to be an nfl player who gets a great deal of visibility because of this tragic incident. should he have not been able to own a firearm? >> the 2nd amendment has been decided by the sue -- supreme court. it's within his right to own a firearm. he should have been aware of the risks associated with it. i think there's an education job we need to do there. we need to have an honest conversation about the risks and dangers associated with firearms. and we need to do what we can from a policy perspective to keep the guns out of the hands of people that are known dangerous. i mean, you have 40% of all gun sales in this country don't go through a background check. there are things we can do like background checks to keep guns you
. then it sprang back to life as part of the extension of the bush tax cuts that president obama signed into law. you have a debate -- very few members dispute that it needs to be continued. the debate is over whether you continue it at the current level. there is an exemption level, $10 million for a couple. or at the white house would prefer a 45% rate. that is the debate right now. there's a split among democrats. the white house wants a less generous estate tax. red-leaning states like max baucus. host: that was the headline recently in "the wall street journal," showing the senators. at its highest, what was the estate tax? how many people did the estate tax affect? guest: we are talking tens of thousands. right now it affects 3000 estates. the exemption level is set high historical novel. it has come down significantly. big argument from conservatives is it hits small businesses and farms. the number a hits is a small fraction. host: if nothing happens, what happens to the estate tax? guest: then it goes back to the levels of an exemption of $1 million. host: and that could hit about 55,00
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)